13th Century Entanglements, Part 1

Charles H. Manekin, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Maryland, held the Ellie and Herbert D. Katz Distinguished Fellowship at the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies in Spring 2013.  The 2012-2013 Fellows contributed to a new web exhibit titled 13th Century Entanglements:  Judaism, Christianity & Islam, in which each Fellow presented a manuscript or printed work used in research during the year.  Professor Manekin chose LJS 229, and his text from the exhibit follows.
Commentary on Averroes’ Middle Commentaries on the Isagoge of Porphyry, the Categories and De Interpretatione of Aristotle

LJS 229 LJS 229

It is hard to overestimate the importance of the first three books of the logical canon known as the Organon—the Isagoge (Introduction) of Porphyry of Tyre, and the Categories and the De Interpretatione of Aristotle—for medieval intellectual life. Already in late antiquity these books were an essential part of the medical…

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Video posted for Manuscripts: The Archaeolozoology of Animal Skin

Video has been posted for “Manuscripts: The Archaeolozoology of Animal Skin,” a lecture at the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts presented April 10, 2014, by Matthew Collins and Sarah Fiddyment from the University of York, and Caroline Checkley-Scott and Stephen J. Milner from the University of Manchester.

The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies was thrilled to welcome the team behind the Books and Beasts project, a collaboration between the Bioarchaeology group at the University of York and the Libraries and Department of Italian at the University of Manchester, which seeks to discover and trace the use of different types of animals used to make parchment, through the use of collagen analysis. The lecture was part of a “whistle-stop East Coast tour” of the team, which included stops in Washington, DC, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, New Haven, and Boston. You can read more about the tour, and the project, at

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Introduction to Bookhand Paleography (9th–17th Centuries): SIMS Summer Course at Penn (#PennPal2014)

sims_logo

¶ Introduction to Bookhand Paleography (9th–17th Centuries)

A Summer Course sponsored by

The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies

The Kislak Center, University of Pennsylvania

Alexander Devine               &                   Amey Hutchins

                   (PhD Candidate, Dept. of English)               (Manuscripts Cataloging Librarian, SIMS)

20th May – 26th June 2014

TuesThurs 10:00-12:00 ~ Vitale II, Kislak Center

This non-credit course offers an introduction to the how, what, and why of reading, dating, and localizing premodern handwriting, concentrating on book scripts of the western European Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Together, we will study the methodology and practice of paleography in Manuscript Studies, learning the tools of working with manuscript materials and reading their texts (in Latin and vernacular languages) and furthering our knowledge of how to recognize the types of script used, with particular attention to letter forms, abbreviations and categories of writing styles over time. Course participants will work with both digital images and premodern manuscripts from Penn’s Special Collections – including the Schoenberg Collection. We will also consider the new electronic resources in Manuscript Studies, from digital transcription tools to online paleographical aids.

Sessions will include both collaborative group transcription and individual manuscript-focused analysis in order to strengthen participants’ skills for advanced research in Paleography and Manuscript Studies. The course will also feature lectures by Penn Faculty & Special Collections specialists.

* All Are Welcome! *

The only requirement for course participation is an interest in learning about Paleography. While knowledge of Latin is useful, it is not required. We welcome both Undergraduate & Graduate students and Library staff from Penn and all institutions in the Philadelphia area. There is no fee for taking this course, but participants are encouraged to purchase several key course texts.

To confirm your interest in participating in this course, please e-mail Alexander Devine at aldevine@sas.upenn.edu. It would be helpful if participants could describe any past paleographical experience, knowledge of Latin, and reasons for wishing to take this course.

 

pennpaleography.wordpress.com ~   schoenberginstitute.wordpress.com

¶ Paleography Workshop with The Penn Paleography Group @ICMS Kalamazoo (V.8.14)

     sims_logo

49th International Congress on Medieval Studies

May 8-11, 2014

¶ CFPP: Call For Paleographical Problems!

Paleography Workshop with The Penn Paleography Group

Sponsored by SIMS (The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies), University of Pennsylvania

Thursday 8th May, 10am (Session 22 ~ Schneider 1140)

This workshop will provide a space for discussing the methodology and practice of paleography in Manuscript Studies and the value of collaborative reading. Rather than a Paleography 101-style workshop, we are eager both to share our experience and to seize the opportunity to open up a larger conversation about paleography with a particular focus on the use of innovative new digital tools and online resources such as Penn in Hand and T-PEN. Topics to be considered may include: how using digital resources has altered our group’s methods of accessing premodern scripts (from written texts and glosses to handwritten addenda and later annotations in early printed books); the dynamics of practicing paleography as a group; and how we can create possibilities for collaborative, interactive transcription.

The workshop will consist of three sections:

  1. A series of ‘lightning presentations’ by group members on selected premodern manuscripts from Penn’s Special Collections, including manuscripts from our newly-acquired Schoenberg Collection.
  2. Discussion of the paleographical challenges presented in these and other manuscripts.
  3. A general discussion section open to all attendees in which we encourage questions about the what, why, and how of paleographical study.

We encourage attendees to bring their own paleographical problems for consideration by all workshop participants. If you have a paleographical challenge that you would like to share in the workshop (preferably accompanied by jpg files of the pertinent folios of your Ms.), it would be helpful for you to contact us in advance, although you are of course very welcome to simply bring your challenges on the day.

* All Are Welcome! – No Registration Required *

However if you would like to confirm your interest in participating in this workshop or to contact us with details of your paleographical problems, please e-mail Alexander Devine at aldevine@sas.upenn.edu.

Contact:

Alexander Devine
The Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies
The Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books & Manuscripts
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 898-7851

pennpaleography.wordpress.com

schoenberginstitute.wordpress.com

A Legacy Inscribed: the Lawrence J. Schoenberg Collection of Manuscripts

The exhibition A Legacy Inscribed: The Lawrence J. Schoenberg Collection of Manuscripts is now available online. The original exhibition was curated by Lynn Ransom and took place March 1 – August 16, 2013 in the Penn Library’s Goldstein Family Gallery, located in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

In 2011, University of Pennsylvania Board members Barbara Brizdle Schoenberg and LawrenceJ. Schoenberg (C53, WG56) donated the Lawrence J. Schoenberg Collection of Manuscripts to the libraries. The Schoenberg collection brings together many of the great scientific and philosophical traditions of the ancient and medieval worlds. Documenting the extraordinary achievements of scholars, philosophers, and scientists in Europe, Africa and Asia, the collection illuminates the foundations of Penn’s academic traditions.

Each section of the exhibition – Arts and Sciences, Communication, Design, Education, Engineering, Law, the Medical Arts, and Social Policy and Practice – showcases texts, textbooks, documents, and letters that…

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LJS 229 paper at Gersonides conference in Geneva

LJS 229LJS 229

Charles Manekin, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Maryland, gave a paper this week about LJS 229, a Hebrew manuscript commentary on commentaries by Averroës  on Aristotle and Porphyry, at a conference at the University of Geneva.  The conference, “Everyone contested his views, no one denied his importance” — Gersonides through the Ages, focused on the transmission and reception of the works of medieval Jewish philosopher and astronomer Gersonides.  Professor Manekin started working with LJS 229 last spring, while holding the Ellie and Herbert D. Katz Distinguished Fellowship at the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies, and discovered that the unidentified author of these commentaries was a member of the school of Gersonides.  Available online are a description by Professor Manekin of the manuscript and its context; the catalog record for the manuscript; and a full digital facsimile.

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Manuscript Monday: LJS 477, pt 2

Jacqueline Burek, graduate student in English at the University of Pennsylvania, introduces Curator for Digital Research Services Dot Porter to the Library’s LJS 477 from the Schoenberg Collection, Florilegium, written in Latin with one inscription in Hebrew, probably in Oxford, England, ca. 1250. This collection of sermons was probably compiled from multiple sources belonging to a preacher, probably Dominican. There are many marginal notes, some indicating the liturgical season or the theme of a sermon, a few noting a cited source (including Ambrose, Gamaliel, and Isidore); excerpts from De animalibus, attributed to Aristotle; notes on natural history including information on birds and insects, arranged alphabetically, followed by information on metals (f. 4r-10v); and excerpts from Isidore’s Etymologies.

Jacqueline Burek also presented LJS 477 on September 21, 2013, at the Delaware Valley Medieval Association Meeting at the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books & Manuscripts of the University of Pennsylvania…

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Manuscript Monday: LJS 477

Jacqueline Burek, a graduate student in English at Penn, presents the University of Pennsylvania Library’s LJS 477 from the Schoenberg Collection, Florilegium, written in Latin with one inscription in Hebrew, probably in Oxford, England, ca. 1250. This collection of sermons was probably compiled from multiple sources belonging to a preacher, probably Dominican. There are  many marginal notes, some indicating the liturgical season or the theme of a sermon, a few noting a cited source (including Ambrose, Gamaliel, and Isidore); excerpts from De animalibus, attributed to Aristotle; notes on natural history including information on birds and insects, arranged alphabetically, followed by information on metals (f. 4r-10v); and excerpts from Isidore’s Etymologies.

It was presented at the Delaware Valley Medieval Association Meeting at the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books & Manuscripts of the University of Pennsylvania Library. September 21, 2013.

 I am a third year PhD student in the English…

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Dr. Will Noel, on the Physical Collation of Manuscripts

Dr. Will Noel, director of the Kislak Special Collections Center for Rare Books & Manuscripts and the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at the University of Pennsylvania Library, speaking at the Delaware Valley Medieval Association Meeting, September 21, 2013, on the physical collation of manuscripts. Visit the Rare Book School Global Digital Library Symposium at http://www.rarebookschool.org/globaldigitallibraries/ .

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MESA, the Medieval Electronic Scholarly Alliance.

Dot Porter speaking about MESA, the Medieval Electronic Scholarly Alliance (MESA), and about Manuscript Mondays at Penn. Presented at the Delaware Valley Medieval Association Meeting. September 21, 2013, at the Kislak Special Collections Center of the University of Pennsylvania Library.

Dot Porter is the Curator for Digital Research Services at the University of Pennsylvania Library and is a member of the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, and a founding co-Director of MESA.

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